SF LATINO FILM FESTIVAL SETS LOCATIONS, SEEKS COLLABORATORS

The SF Latino Film Festival is gearing up for its 8th annual September events, celebrating independent film from the Americas and Europe. Our goal is to showcase film by, about, or made with Latinos—to shine a light on inclusion. Other films are presented to expose our innovative and influential Bay Area audiences to popular foreign film as a way to celebrate cultural differences.

The festival committee invites collaborators to sponsor, host, and contribute content to our upcoming events. Venues on the confirmed schedule include the following Bay Area locations.

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema – New Mission 2550 Mission St, San Francisco, CA 94110

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DeYoung Museum 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Dr, San Francisco, CA 94118

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Eastside Arts Alliance 2277 International Blvd, Oakland, CA 94606

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Yerba Buena Center for the Arts 701 Mission St, San Francisco, CA 94103

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For more information, contact the festival development rep directly here: http://bit.ly/bizdevsf. The SF Latino Film Festival is a 501 C non-profit organization. Outside of our signature event each September, we host monthly screenings and collaborations with other festivals in San Francisco, including: Berlin & Beyond Film Fest, SF Int’l Film Fest, SF LGBT Film Festival, SF Jewish Film Fest, SF Flamenco Festival aside from promotional early screenings of mainstream films.

 

Presentation of Mexican Film “Post Tenebras Lux” May 29 -June 2

Cine+Mas SF is proud to be co-presenting this film with Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.

The new film by maverick Mexican filmmaker Carlos Reygadas is his most personal and challenging work to date. Post Tenebras Lux (“After darkness, light” in Latin) is a disorienting, kaleidoscopic, and visually stunning vision of a family torn between compassion and violence. It completely divided audiences at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, where Reygadas was awarded Best Director. (2012, 120 min, DCP)

May 30, 2013 7:30pm
May 31, 2013 7:30pm
Jun 1, 2013 7:30pm
Jun 2, 2013 2:00pm
Jun 2, 2013 4:30pm

 Screening Room
$10 regular/$8 YBCA member, senior, student, teacher

 

 

BUY TICKETS

 

 

September Film Programming Update

Filmmaker

Our programming team has been screening, discussing, arguing and carefully deciding on the final few films that will makeup the official selection for our film festival, which kicks off September 15th.

If you’ve submitted a film, hold tight. You will be notified if your film has been selected. We received an amazing crop of film to choose from and we’re very excited about reporting our selections soon.

The development team has been ironing out community partnerships and will also be reporting those and exciting new additions to the festival’s dynamic.

Stay tuned to our industry shout-outs via Twitter or spark a convo with us on Facebook. We’re chatty, so feel free to voice your film thoughts with us!

Immigration Nation Screens in SF

Immigration Nation!

June 23, 7PM join us at IcTus Gallery for the special event screening of “IMMIGRATION NATION: The Battle for the Dream!”

It’s part of our encore screening series Cine+Mas SF @ The IcTus.

The IcTus is located at 1769 15th Street (between Valencia & Guerrero).

Special thanks to LAM Social Club, our community partners.

Film notes & trailer for “Immigration Nation!: The Battle for the Dream” here. Also visit, www.immigrationnationfilm.com, for more information about the film.

 

THE STORM THAT SWEPT MEXICO

Pancho Villa

The Mexican Revolution was the first major revolution to be filmed. The Storm that Swept Mexico incorporates photographs and motion pictures from these earliest days of cinema, many of which have never before been seen outside of Mexico.

Ten years in the making by Bay Area filmmakers Ray Telles and Kenn Rabin, The Storm that Swept Mexico is a powerful exploration of one of the most fascinating eras in modern history.

This exclusive new documentary The Storm that Swept Mexico, which tells the epic story of the Mexican revolution of 1910, the first major political and social revolution of the 20th century, will screen only one night in the Bay Area and will be followed by a conversation with the filmmakers.

This rare footage will be on the big screen Thursday, March 31, 7:00pM at 1118 Fourth Street, San Rafael. Call 415.454.1222 for more information. This is a California Film Institute screening.

Watch the trailer.



@vc29

One Day San Francisco Film Festival

The Wall by Ricardo Martinez

SOMArts Theatre in San Francisco will screen seven films, followed by a Q&A session and reception with the filmmakers
 on Sunday, March 13 from noon – 8:00 p.m.

This free one-day-only San Francisco film festival celebrates crossings and dismantling of symbolic, nationalistic, cultural, internal, and external borders.

Also catch a chance to see the SF Latino Film Festival Audience Choice 2010 winning documentary The Wall by Bay Area native Ricardo Martinez. View trailer here.

More stand out films include: Crepe Covered Sidewalks by acclaimed singer and actor Renee Wilson and In The Matter of Cha Jung Hee by Deann Borshay Liem.
For a complete film schedule and summaries click here.

@EricAvilaThomas

 

Somos Lo Que Hay at San Diego Latino Film Festival

Somos Lo Que Hay

The 18th annual San Diego Latino Film Festival kicks off tonight with a screening of the highly anticipated thriller Somos Lo Que Hay, a Canana film about cannibals in modern day Mexico City.

We’re excited to see it along with a slew of new Spanish language films this weekend. Tweet us if you’re out there @sflatinofilm.

To get more information about San Diego Latino Film Festival screenings go to sdlatinofilm.com, follow them on Twitter @macsd and follow hashtag #SDLFF11.

Here’s a trailer of Somos Lo Que Hay.


Directed by Jorge Michel Grau.

@vc29

A Salute to María Félix

Maria Felix

On International Women’s Day, María Félix aka La Doña came to mind.

Not only is she the most recognized face from the Golden Age of Mexican cinema but she was also a trailblazer, pursuing her career aspirations despite cultural norms of the times.

She starred in a total of 52 films and only played roles that embodied who she really was – a strong, cut-throat femme fatale. Félix turned down anything that fell short of those standards.

Here is a short clip of Félix as Angela in Doña Diabla, a 1950 Mexican drama.

@vc29