Indivisible, Documentary about families affected by deportations

INDIVISIBLE, SFLFF8 Official selection, screens at the Roxie Theater this month. We’re excited to welcome filmmaker Hilary Linder to the screening with a Q&A after the film. San Francisco Premiere.

INDIVISIBLE

Saturday, Nov 19 @ 4:30pm

Renata, Evelyn, and Antonio are three undocumented children who want nothing more than to be reunited with the families who were ripped from them and deported when they were young. At a pivotal moment in each of their lives—while fighting for their chance to be citizens—they are allowed to visit their families. But immigration reform faces an uncertain future, and there is no way to know if this visit will be the last time. Director Hilary Linder in person for Q&A!  SFLFF8 selection. San Francisco premiere.
TICKETS

Pichuco Screens Dec 5-6 in San Francisco, Tango doc & Performance

A documentary about Aníbal Troilo, an Argentine Tango giant, in celebration of his 100th birthday. Troilo’s music lives and enjoyed by tango dancers throughout the world. Directed by Martin Turnes.

Synopsis
A teacher at the Escuelar de Música Popular in Buenos Aires, Argentina, together with his students, took on the project of digitizing ~500 original, handwritten arrangements of Aníbal “Pichuco” Troilo orchestra. Through interviews of musicians from different generations and styles, this documentary takes us to a musical tour through the work of one of the most influential characters in the history of Tango and Argentine music.

Tickets & Times
$15 + fee online, $20 at the door
Purchase tickets at EventBrite http://bit.ly/1A0h49b.
Dec 5, 2014 (Fri) . 8pm . Door opens at 7pm
Dec 6, 2014 (Sat) . 8pm . Door opens at 7pm
Theatre of Yugen at NOHspace, 2840 Mariposa Street, San Francisco (Free street parking)

Tango Performance
The screening will be followed by a tango performance. Performances by some of the finest tango instructors and performers of the Bay Area, including Cristian Sierra and Casanova Tango, Doruk Golcu and Erin Malley, Jonas Aquino and Monza Lui.

Latin American Stories at SF DocFest; Co-Presenting The Engineer

The 13th San Francisco DocFest runs from  June 5th to 19th with screenings, panels and events in San Francisco and Oakland.  Cine+Mas SF is co-presenting THE ENGINEER, a biographical film that profiles a criminologist in El Salvador who has dedicated his life  life to finding the missing children, casualties of the ongoing brutal gang violence that’s plagued the country for years. For tickets:  http://bit.ly/1jo6GT8

THE ENGINEER
El Salvador/Guatemala/UK-  Directors Juan Luis Passarelli and Matthew Charles
Roxie Theater Sat Jun 7 9:15PM / Thu, Jun 12 9:15 PM
For tickets: http://bit.ly/1jo6GT8
“Israel Ticas is the only criminologist working in one of Latin America’s most dangerous countries, El Salvador. He has made it his mission to find the hundreds of missing teenagers who have fallen victim to the country’s brutal gang conflict. He travels from one crime scene to another, always in danger of becoming a victim himself. The filmmakers hold nothing back showing us the grim and graphic realities of his work and his devotion to finding all those lost.” – JM/SFDocFest

OF KITES AND BORDERS/De Cometas y Fronteras
Spain/Mexico- Dir. Yolanda Pividal
Roxie TheatreSun, Jun 8 2:30 PM
For tickets/trailer: http://bit.ly/1ngkccK

“Through the eyes of four working children in the city of Tijuana, we see the daily struggles of children living on the US-Mexico border. Eddie is a teen who smuggles immigrants into the United States, Carmela is a nine-year old who works in the city dump and dreams about going to school. And brothers Adrián and Fernando don wrestling masks to perform matches at busy intersections in order to support their family. Screens with Life on the Line.” – JM/SFDocFest

Bronx Obama
USA – Dir. Ryan Murdock
Roxie Theatre Sun, Jun 8 7PM – Jun 11 9:15PM
Oakland School for the Arts Sat, Jun 14 5PM
Tickets/Trailer: http://bit.ly/1nfIAex
“When Louis Ortiz shaved off his goatee one day in 2008, his life changed forever. He looked in the mirror and he didn’t see himself – a middle-aged, unemployed Puerto Rican father from the Bronx. He saw the face of change, of hope… of money. BRONX OBAMA tells the strange and improbable tale of a Barack Obama impersonator who tries to cash in on the ‘look of a lifetime’ and chases a fevered American dream from opportunity to oblivion.” – JM/SFDocFest

For full program details visit SFIndie.com

Who is Dayani Cristal? – Screening only if you get your tickets this week

Who Is Dayani Cristal? will screen in San Francisco and Berkeley for one showing only if you buy your tickets this week. Visit the links to buy tickets and learn more about the documentary.

DayaniPoster

The body of an unidentified immigrant is found in the Arizona Desert. In an attempt to retrace his path and discover his story, director Marc Silver and Gael Garcia Bernal embed themselves among migrant travelers on their own mission to cross the border, providing rare insight into the human stories which are so often ignored in the immigration debate. San Francisco

June 4th 7:30PM at Opera Plaza Cinemas – San Francisco Tickets:  http://bit.ly/1vN9SNn
June 9th 7:30PM at Berkeley 7 – Berkeley                 Tickets:  http://bit.ly/1vNc8UN Postponed. Stay tuned.

Flamenco doc Guitarra de Palo at Brava Theater April 6

In honor of Paco de Lucia, Bay Area Flamenco is celebrating his life and talent with a memorable program of flamenco performances with reknown artists and a documentary film premiere on Sunday April 6 6PM at the Brava Theater in San Francisco. Visit BayAreaFlamencoFestival.org for full program details and tickets.  Read more about the film, Guitarra de Palo, below.

Guitarra de Palo, by director Andrea Zapata Girau is an anthropological-musical documentary voyage without dialogue or narration: the music speaks for itself. Shot in Spain, Cuba, the United States, Nicaragua, Germany, Russia and the Cayman Islands, the flamenco guitar acts as the main character as the film showcases some of the most renowned names of flamenco and its contemporary fusions. The documentary is highlighted by its stunning cinematography and its sound design, the work of Goya Award winner (Spain’s Academy Awards) Pelayo Guiterrez and Nacho Royo-Villanova.

GUITARRA DE PALO trailer 2013 from guitarradepalo.

 

@SFLucho

La Salsa Cubana – DVD Release Party- May 30 – Mission Cultural Center


La Salsa Cubana was an audience favorite at the 2011 Cine+Mas SF Latino Film Festival.  We encourage you to come out for the DVD Release party taking place at the Mission Cultural Center on Thursday May 30 at 7:30 PM.

LaSalsaCubanaDVDDirector Eric Joseph Johnson will be in attendance. The celebration will include music, dancing, and performances- in short, you’ll get a taste of casino live!

La Salsa Cubana is the first film to explore Cuban salsa, known as casino, since it appeared in Havana social clubs in the 1950s. With a soundtrack that features Cuba’s all-time greatest musical legends, it follows a dance group from the Guanabacoa neighborhood as they strive against all odds to win the national dance competition.

Screening and Party $13  CLICK HERE http://bit.ly/18QBJ3M or at the Mission Cultural Center Box Office.

If you can’t make it to the screening you can purchase the film online at Amazon, iTunes, and other online retailers.

 

@SFLucho

 

Shenandoah, Documentary Screening & Conversation April 29

Shenandoah, a coal-mining town with a proud immigrant past, once fueled America’s industrial revolution. Today, it is a town in decline, and the descendants of yesterday’s European immigrants rub shoulders with the Mexican immigrants of today. Tensions came to a head when four white football players were charged in the beating death of Luis Ramirez, an undocumented Mexican migrant. In the documentary “Shenandoah,” Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer turned director David Turnley creates a deeply felt portrait of a working-class community torn apart by violence. 97 minutes. English.

“It was a tragedy that touched upon several great national themes — the dislocation wrought by fading industry, the turmoil of immigration, the endurance of sports…” — Sam Dolnick, The New York Times

Director David Turnley will hold a question-and-answer session after the film.

Free advance tickets for this event. Free tickets will also be available at the door on a first-come, first-served basis.

Monday, April 29, 6:30 pm

UC Berkeley Campus – 145 Dwinelle Hall

@SFLucho

“Harvest of Empire” – Showing in San Francisco & Berkeley- March 8-14

“We are all Americans of the New World, and our most dangerous enemies are not each other, but the great wall of ignorance between us.” – Juan González, Harvest of Empire

Win tickets to any screening. Email us at programming (at) SfLatinoFilmFestival.com  with your name & either Harvest/Berkeley or Harvest/SanFrancisco in the subject line.

At a time of heated and divisive debate over immigration, comes HARVEST OF EMPIRE, a feature-length documentary that examines the direct connection between the long history of U.S. intervention in Latin America and the immigration crisis we face today. Based on the groundbreaking book by award-winning journalist Juan González, HARVEST OF EMPIRE takes an unflinching look at the role that U.S. economic and military interests played in triggering an unprecedented wave of migration that is transforming our nation’s cultural and economic landscape.

From the wars for territorial expansion that gave the U.S. control of Puerto Rico, Cuba and more than half of Mexico, to the covert operations that imposed oppressive military regimes in the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador, this documentary unveils a moving human story that is largely unknown to the great majority of citizens in the U.S. “They never teach us in school that the huge Latino presence here is a direct result of our own government’s actions in Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America over many decades — actions that forced millions from that region to leave their homeland and journey north,” says Juan González at the beginning of the film.

The film features present day immigrant stories, rarely seen archival material, as well as interviews with such respected figures as Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Rigoberta Menchú, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, ACLU Executive Director Anthony Romero, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Junot Díaz, Mexican historian Dr. Lorenzo Meyer, journalists Maria Hinojosa and Geraldo Rivera, Grammy award-winning singer Luis Enrique, and poet Martín Espada.

Filmmakers are producer J. Wendy Thompson-Marquez (Onyx Media Group, EVS Communications, Telemundo), co-director & producer Eduardo López (EVS Communications, Spanish TV’s Línea Directa, winner of Ford Foundation’s Leadership for a Changing World Award), and co-director & producer Peter Getzels (PBS series Closer to Truth, documentaries for National Geographic, BBC, Channel 4, Discovery Channel.)

Landmark’s Opera Plaza Cinemas, 601 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco
DIRECTOR IN PERSON: Eduardo Lopez will speak in person on 3/8 at the 7:00pm & 9:40pm shows
Showtimes (valid 3/8-3/14): Fri-Sat: 12:15, 2:35, 4:50, 7:00, 9:40; Sun: 12:15, 2:35, 4:50, 7:00; Mon-Thur: 2:35, 4:50, 7:00 BUY TICKETS

Landmark’s Shattuck Cinemas, 2230 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley (510) 644-2992
DIRECTOR IN PERSON: Eduardo Lopez will speak in person on 3/9 at the 5:00pm & 7:20pm shows.
Showtimes (valid 3/8-3/14): Fri-Thur: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 BUY TICKETS

 

PBS Series- Latino Americans, Narrated by Benjamin Bratt

PBS announced actor Benjamin Bratt will narrate LATINO AMERICANS, a landmark three-part, six-hour documentary series that is set to air nationally on PBS in the fall of 2013. It is the first major documentary series for television to chronicle the rich and varied history and experiences of Latinos, who have helped shape the United States over the last 500-plus years and have become, with more than 50 million people, the largest minority group in the U.S.

Bratt, a multi-award winner for his work on television’s “Law & Order” and star of several films including La Mission, Pinero and Traffic, will narrate LATINO AMERICANS. A team of filmmakers will document the evolution of a new “Latino American” identity from the 1500s to the present day, with interviews with close to 100 Latinos from the worlds of politics, business and pop culture, as well as deeply personal portraits of Latinos who lived through key chapters in American history.

LATINO AMERICANS features interviews with an array of individuals, including entertainer Rita Moreno, the Puerto Rican star of West Side Story and a winner of Academy, Tony, Grammy and Emmy Awards; labor leader and 2012 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient Dolores Huerta, who in the 1960s co-founded with César Chávez the National Farm Workers Association, which later became United Farm Workers of America; Mexican-American author and commentator Linda Chávez, who became the highest-ranking woman in the Reagan White House; and Cuban-American singer and entrepreneur Gloria Estefan, who has sold more than 100 million solo and Miami Sound Machine albums globally.

The acclaimed singer-songwriter Lila Downs will serve as the featured artist for the series, performing the closing song in LATINO AMERICANS. Downs, born in Oaxaca, Mexico, began performing traditional Mexican rancheras as a girl, and singing with mariachis.  “The importance of music as a form of cultural expression to Latinos cannot be understated,” Downs said. “It’s a privilege to have our music be a part of this series, building on that rich tradition.”

LATINO AMERICANS relies on historical accounts and personal experiences to vividly tell the stories of early settlement, conquest and immigration; of tradition and reinvention; of anguish and celebration; and of the creation of this new American identity with an influx of arrivals from Mexico, Spain, Puerto Rico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic and countries in Central and South America.

The series is broken into the following six chronological segments that cover the 1500s to the present day.


Crowd-Funding Film Project: Prodigal Daughter

After nearly two decades disconnected- by choice- from her family and from her homeland, Prodigal Daughter Mabel Valdiviezo gets her American visa to reconnect with her family in Peru only to learn that the family barely survived the Fujimori regime. Moreover, there’s a secret of her own that she’s compelled to reveal.

Once face to face with her aging parents and now grown siblings, expectations come down clashing on both sides threatening an already fragile bond. Her family recriminates Mabel for her absence and candidly recount how they struggled to survive both terrorism and the dictatorship.

In a desperate attempt to seek a better life just like Mabel did, her brothers immigrated to Japan only to be deported right back. Her father had a bigamous marriage to a Japanese woman for a visa and her mother almost committed suicide over a mounting debt to a loan shark. They view Mabel as the lucky one, yet she still has to tell them how immigration brought her more sorrow than happiness.

Negotiating between their withheld affection and requests of financial help and visa sponsorship, Mabel gathers courage to tell her secret and put their demands into perspective. Now, she must find a way to regain their love and respect or risk being shunned and disowned. Prodigal Daughter explores the complex relationship between parents and children when geography and mismatched expectations sets them apart.